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What is a knee Replacement?

Knee replacement or knee arthroplasty is a procedure in which a portion or the entire knee joint is surfaces are replaced with surgically implanted metal and plastic components that have been shaped to provide correct joint movement. This procedure is most commonly performed to reduce the pain and disability primarily caused by severe osteoarthritis or other causes of debilitating pain, which might include cartilage defects, meniscus tears and major tendon tears.

Knee replacement surgery is generally only considered when medication, physical therapy, or other treatment modalities have failed, or promise to be ineffective.

The goal of this procedure is pain reduction and improvement in knee function

What about a Partial Knee Replacement?

For some patients, only a portion of the knee surfaces have been worn away from arthritis. These patients may be a good candidate for a partial knee replacement, where only a small portion or the knee joint surfaces are removed, and replaced with metal and plastic components. Most frequently, patients who receive a partial knee replacement go home the same day as the surgery, and require little to no physical therapy to return to normal daily activities, with significantly reduced, or no pain.

What is Hip Replacement?

Hip replacement, or hip arthroplasty, is a procedure in which a portion or the entire hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. A total hip replacement is most commonly performed to relieve severe pain that is associated with severe osteoarthritis. Additionally, a total or partial hip replacement may be performed to correct joint deformity or damage that result from certain hip fractures.

Hip replacement surgery is generally only considered when medication, physical therapy, or other treatment modalities have failed, or promise to be ineffective.

The goal of this procedure is pain reduction and improvement in hip function

What is Shoulder Replacement?

Shoulder replacement, or shoulder arthroplasty, is a procedure in the shoulder joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. A shoulder replacement is most commonly performed to relieve severe pain that is associated with osteoarthritis.

Shoulder replacement surgery is generally only considered when medication, physical therapy, lifestyle changes, or other treatment modalities have failed, or promise to be ineffective.

The goal of this procedure is pain reduction and improvement in shoulder function.

How long will I be in the hospital?

Our goal is that patients will get out of bed, and begin walking on the day of their surgery. Recipients of a Partial knee replacement will generally go home the day of their surgery, while Total Hip, and Total Knee replacement patients generally go home within 1 to 2 days after surgery. Many patients go home the next day.

How long will my new joint last?

All implants have a limited life expectancy depending on the individuals weight, activity level and other medical conditions. When joint replacements were pioneered in the in 1970’s it was believed that the replacements would last 10 years.

Recent research has shown that 90-95% of hip and knee replacements will last 10 years, and that 80-85% of hip and knee replacements will last 20 years.

How long does it take to recover from a joint replacement?

The vast majority of patients who have a hip or knee replacement have dramatic improvement in function and pain reduction within weeks of the surgery. The joint surface is completely corrected and functional by the end of the actual procedure. The recovery period is focused on healing the skin, muscle and ligament damage that is a result of the surgical procedure. It is during this time that you will work to heal and strengthen the muscles, and stretch the tissues as they heal.

About 6 weeks after the surgery, most patients are walking comfortable with little or no support, and when muscle strength is restored, patients can resume most all of their normal activities.

Will the surgery be painful?

You will have some pain following your surgery, but our goal is to minimize this pain. Your pain I s controlled in many ways, including nerve blocks (numbing the nerve with medication), surgical site injection during surgery, and Oral pain medications afterward.   Plan for your pain to be a a level that still allows you to walk, eat, sleep, and do your daily exercises.

Pain after is variable from person to person, so we encourage you to communicate your pain level to your care providers. Advances in pain control allow us to intervene quickly and efficiently after surgery.

Will I need a walker, crutches, or cane?

We will work with you using a front wheeled walker immediately after surgery. Generally, patients progress from a walker, to a cane, and to no assistive device at all.

Each patient progresses at their own rate, so the length of time that you need with each device will be made on an individual basis between the patient, the therapist, and the physician.